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Gower College Swansea selects sports scholarship students for 2014 / 15

Seventeen students at Gower College Swansea have been successful in their applications for sports scholarships, following in the footsteps of alumni such as Leigh Halfpenny, Justin Tipuric and Jazz Carlin.


The specialist scholarship programme is offered to promising young athletes who play representative sport at either county or national level. This year's successful students are:

  • Megan Baker Rees (formerly Glan Afan School) - Netball and Basketball
  • Danny Birch (Cwmtawe) - Football
  • Jack Cambriani (Gowerton) - Rugby
  • Lukas Carey (Pontarddulais) - Cricket
  • Keelan Giles (Gowerton) - Rugby
  • Tom Howell (Gowerton) - Rugby
  • Hannah Hutchinson (Pentrehafod) - Netball
  • William Jones (Gowerton) - Rugby and Judo
  • Bronwen Lee (Pontardulais) - Fencing
  • Bethan Lewis (Bishopston) - Rugby
  • Charlie Lewis Bown (Bishopston) - Hockey
  • Ross Mainwaring (Pentrehafod) - Football
  • Connor Morgan (Dylan Thomas) - Football
  • Brett Nethell (Bryngwyn) - Cycling
  • Cory Saunders - Football
  • Sam Thomas (Bishopston) - Sailing
  • Casey Williams (Penyrheol) - Gymnastics


"The scholarship programme is a fantastic opportunity for anyone who is serious about their sport and wants to take it to the next level," says lecturer Marc O'Kelly. "As well as financial and coaching support, it provides students with opportunities to compete at the highest levels and gain professional contacts within their chosen field. It's all about inspiring excellence and the sports scholarship students are great role models for the whole college."

Photo: Sport scholarship students 2014 / 15 pictured at the Liberty Stadium with Principal Mark Jones (A Frame Photography).

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